@RyanNewYork

Ryan J. Davis is the Global Head of Social Commerce at NJOY.

Formerly he was Vice President of Community at Vocativ, Director of Social Media at Blue State Digital and a co-founder and digital director of The Four 2012. Ryan is most proud of his time spent on the internet team during Howard Dean’s 2004 Presidential Campaign.

Davis sits on the Board of Directors of The Ali Forney Center, where he was the founding producer of their annual Broadway Beauty Pageant fundraiser. Additionally, Ryan is on the Board of Directors of The Deconstructive Theatre Project, the Board of Advisors of the startup Public Stand and the Executive Board of LAMBDA Independent Democrats of Brooklyn.

Ryan has written about politics for The Huffington Post, The Hill and Next Magazine. He was once a guest editor of Queerty. For his progressive activism, Davis was awarded two Pollie Awards by The American Association of Political Consultants.

A former theatre creator and director, Ryan’s favorite projects include Veritas (Fringe 2010), Street Lights (NYMF 2009) and the eventually Whoopi Goldberg produced White Noise (NYMF 2006).

Ryan has lived in New York City since 2000 and is a proud resident of Bushwick, Brooklyn.

Here Ryan blogs about politics, film, TV, history, religion, science, books, theater, digital media, LGBT issues, Bushwick & Williamsburg, New York City, and anything else he's interested in at the moment. Oh, and he'll probably talk a lot about himself.

Ryan has keynoted at conferences and universities around the world on digital politics, social media strategy and LGBT rights. Email to discuss setting up a speaking engagement.

Connect with him over social media using the icons below.

This is a personal blog. Any opinions expressed here and on my Twitter account represent my own and not those of my employer or clients.
Posts tagged "republicans"

Lincoln was the only Republican president to show up at the I Have A Dream 50th anniversary.

Mitt Romney: Against catfish before he was for it.

Mitt Romney: Let Detroit Go Bankrupt

Nov. 18 2008

IF General Motors, Ford and Chrysler get the bailout that their chief executives asked for yesterday, you can kiss the American automotive industry goodbye. It won’t go overnight, but its demise will be virtually guaranteed.

Without that bailout, Detroit will need to drastically restructure itself. With it, the automakers will stay the course — the suicidal course of declining market shares, insurmountable labor and retiree burdens, technology atrophy, product inferiority and never-ending job losses. Detroit needs a turnaround, not a check.

I love cars, American cars. I was born in Detroit, the son of an auto chief executive. In 1954, my dad, George Romney, was tapped to run American Motors when its president suddenly died. The company itself was on life support — banks were threatening to deal it a death blow. The stock collapsed. I watched Dad work to turn the company around — and years later at business school, they were still talking about it. From the lessons of that turnaround, and from my own experiences, I have several prescriptions for Detroit’s automakers.

First, their huge disadvantage in costs relative to foreign brands must be eliminated. That means new labor agreements to align pay and benefits to match those of workers at competitors like BMW, Honda, Nissan and Toyota. Furthermore, retiree benefits must be reduced so that the total burden per auto for domestic makers is not higher than that of foreign producers.

That extra burden is estimated to be more than $2,000 per car. Think what that means: Ford, for example, needs to cut $2,000 worth of features and quality out of its Taurus to compete with Toyota’s Avalon. Of course the Avalon feels like a better product — it has $2,000 more put into it. Considering this disadvantage, Detroit has done a remarkable job of designing and engineering its cars. But if this cost penalty persists, any bailout will only delay the inevitable.

Second, management as is must go. New faces should be recruited from unrelated industries — from companies widely respected for excellence in marketing, innovation, creativity and labor relations.

The new management must work with labor leaders to see that the enmity between labor and management comes to an end. This division is a holdover from the early years of the last century, when unions brought workers job security and better wages and benefits. But as Walter Reuther, the former head of the United Automobile Workers, said to my father, “Getting more and more pay for less and less work is a dead-end street.”

You don’t have to look far for industries with unions that went down that road. Companies in the 21st century cannot perpetuate the destructive labor relations of the 20th. This will mean a new direction for the U.A.W., profit sharing or stock grants to all employees and a change in Big Three management culture.

The need for collaboration will mean accepting sanity in salaries and perks. At American Motors, my dad cut his pay and that of his executive team, he bought stock in the company, and he went out to factories to talk to workers directly. Get rid of the planes, the executive dining rooms — all the symbols that breed resentment among the hundreds of thousands who will also be sacrificing to keep the companies afloat.

Investments must be made for the future. No more focus on quarterly earnings or the kind of short-term stock appreciation that means quick riches for executives with options. Manage with an eye on cash flow, balance sheets and long-term appreciation. Invest in truly competitive products and innovative technologies — especially fuel-saving designs — that may not arrive for years. Starving research and development is like eating the seed corn.

Just as important to the future of American carmakers is the sales force. When sales are down, you don’t want to lose the only people who can get them to grow. So don’t fire the best dealers, and don’t crush them with new financial or performance demands they can’t meet.

It is not wrong to ask for government help, but the automakers should come up with a win-win proposition. I believe the federal government should invest substantially more in basic research — on new energy sources, fuel-economy technology, materials science and the like — that will ultimately benefit the automotive industry, along with many others. I believe Washington should raise energy research spending to $20 billion a year, from the $4 billion that is spent today. The research could be done at universities, at research labs and even through public-private collaboration. The federal government should also rectify the imbedded tax penalties that favor foreign carmakers.

But don’t ask Washington to give shareholders and bondholders a free pass — they bet on management and they lost.

The American auto industry is vital to our national interest as an employer and as a hub for manufacturing. A managed bankruptcy may be the only path to the fundamental restructuring the industry needs. It would permit the companies to shed excess labor, pension and real estate costs. The federal government should provide guarantees for post-bankruptcy financing and assure car buyers that their warranties are not at risk.

In a managed bankruptcy, the federal government would propel newly competitive and viable automakers, rather than seal their fate with a bailout check.

Mitt Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts, was a candidate for this year’s Republican presidential nomination.

A conservative, a moderate, and a liberal walk into a bar. And the bartender goes, “Hey, it’s Mitt Romney!”
Rick Santorum Super PAC funder Foster Friess
Rick Santorum decisively swept all three primary contests last night, shattering the myth of inevitability that presumed front-runner Mitt Romney…
Too funny.
Update: Zack Ford tells me this is photoshopped. It’s still really funny. 

Too funny.

Update: Zack Ford tells me this is photoshopped. It’s still really funny. 

(via jaredgeller)

Here’s Mitt Romney signing his Massachusetts health care reform law. Judge for yourself if he’s doing it under duress. He looks pretty happy to me. 

One of the best things about the Republican Primary Calendar is that it finally gave billionaires a chance to have their voices heard.

Mitt Romney as a boy, back when he still looked up to his dad. 
Romney’s decision today to release only two years of tax returns would clearly disappoint his father. 
When George Romney ran for president, he released 12 years of tax returns, saying “One year could be a fluke, perhaps done for show.” Mitt’s choosing to release his dullest years, avoiding anything during his controversial tenure at Bain Capital. Daddy wouldn’t approve.    

Mitt Romney as a boy, back when he still looked up to his dad.

Romney’s decision today to release only two years of tax returns would clearly disappoint his father.

When George Romney ran for president, he released 12 years of tax returns, saying “One year could be a fluke, perhaps done for show.” Mitt’s choosing to release his dullest years, avoiding anything during his controversial tenure at Bain Capital. Daddy wouldn’t approve.    

Still from a Mitt Romney YouTube ad that the campaign has probably come to regret.

Every Republican since 1980 who has won South Carolina has become the party’s nominee. 

Mitt Romney’s support is not just fading in South Carolina, as the above graph shows, it’s “collapsing” nationally too. That’s Newt with the national positive trend line, who also has a very real shot of winning South Carolina tomorrow.

Gallup’s Editor-in-chief Frank Newport appeared on MSNBC to talk about the polling organization’s national tracking poll of the GOP primary race, which is changing rapidly in the last few days of the campaign for South Carolina. Newport said when their new data comes out at 1 pm eastern, “…we’ll see this gap closing more. Romney was up 23 points over Newt Gingrich. Now it will be down about ten points, so clearly things are collapsing.”

The Gallup tracking poll showed a huge lead for Romney after winning the New Hampshire primary and it seemed that he was on the way to locking down the nomination. Now that Newt Gingrich has resurged in South Carolina, and taken the media narrative along with him, Romney is faltering nationally.

“We have seen more movement, more roller coaster kind of effect this year than any other Republican primary in our history of tracking,” Newport said. “I think anything is possible. It wouldn’t be out of the realm of possibility if Romney recovers. We’ll wait and see.”

The five minutes that may win Newt the South Carolina primary.

Scary Tweet Of The Day

When Mitt Romney Came To Town

Click above to watch the new short documentary When Mitt Romney Came To Town, about Romney’s time at Bain Capital as a corporate raider, closing and cashing in on companies they’d purchase. This film interviews many of the former employees who lost their jobs after a Bain Capital visit. 

Share with any of your friends who are considering supporting Mitt Romney.